Thursday, August 4, 2016

June 17, 1894: Lynchings In Four States

Today we have an editorial found in the pages of The Atlanta Constitution (Atlanta, Georgia) dated June 17, 1894:


LYNCHINGS IN FOUR STATES.

Official Statistics from South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. 

Editor Constitution—As a substantial and all sufficient answer to the charge of barbarism made against the south because of our repeated lynchings, I have to append a table, showing the lynchings in the states of Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Florida during the year 1893. I have taken these from the news columns of The Constitution for that period, and have selected those states, because their proximity insures an approximate correctness of the news service.

State Where         Color of         Color of      Fate of
      Perpetrated          Assailant      Victim      Criminal    

Alabama............Negro.        White.      Lynched.
Georgia......................Negro.    White.    Unknown.
South Carolina........Negro.    White.      Unknown.
South Carolina ......Negro.      White.      Unknown.
South Carolina ........Negro.      White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.       White.    Hung by law.
Georgia............Negro.      White.    Unknown.
Florida............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Unknown.     White.    Unknown.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Florida............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.   Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............White.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia................White.     White.    Unknown.
South Carolina.............*Negro.     White.    Lynched. 
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Florida............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     Negro.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............Negro.     White.   Killed by woman. 
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
 South Carolina............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............!Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Georgia............White.     White.    Unknown.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
Alabama............Negro.     White.    Lynched.
South Carolina............?Negro.     White.    Lynched.

*Two      !Four    ?Three

It will be seen that during the period named there have been in all fifty-four cases of criminal assaults on women, of these twenty-two were in Georgia, fourteen in South Carolina, Fifteen in Alabama, and three in Florida. In forty-eight cases they were by negroes, forty-six of which were upon white women and one case, color unknown, upon a white woman; to sum up, fifty-two of the victims were white women and two were negro women. The color of the unknown assailant could not be determined, because only the name was given. Three of the assaults were of a most atrocious character, one having been committed by two negroes, one by three negroes and one by four negroes, all upon white women, and I am happy to state that for these three assaults nine negroes were lynched.

The fate of the assailants shows that in twenty-seven cases, thirty-three negroes were lynched, one was hung by law, one was shot and killed by his victim and twenty-five are unknown, by which I mean that they were either in the custody of the law or escaped with a party of outraged citizens in pursuit. I should say that fifteen of this number would be a reasonable estimate of those "lost in the woods" or "in crossing the creek," which would bring the total number lynched up to forty-eight, and it is probable that the most of these in custody will be hung. It is possible that several may have made good their escape.

Of course we have no excuses or apologies to make, but if our northern brethren or British cousins insist upon shedding any tears or expending any sympathy on this subject, we submit that it could be more appropriately bestowed upon their Anglo-Saxon kinsmen, and that the chaste and innocent victims of the brutal lust of these negroes are much more entitled to their commiseration than the fiends incarnate, who committed these hellish crimes, and who only paid the just penalty of their deeds. If the people who are given to this mawkish sentiment are really so much concerned, the best thing for them to do is to address their entreaties to the negroes, for just as soon as the provocation ceases the lynchings will stop, and I may as well add—no sooner.

This is a question that involves both the security of our homes and the immunity of our women from these heinous assaults, and, however much we may desire the good opinion of the rest of the world, we cannot think of purchasing it at so fearful a cost, for our homes and our women are two objects on earth that southern men hold nearer and dearer and more sacred than all others. They constitute the very corner stone and crowning glory of our peculiar civilization, with which we are perfectly content, whatever others may think of it.

J. F. T.


I don't know why it mentions two Negro victims when only one is on the list. 

This is an example of how information can be manipulated. One, it pretends that the only reason for lynching was rape. Two, it uses only its own data. Three, it assumes every man accused is guilty. Four, it assumes all rapes are reported.

Thank you for joining me and as always, I hope I leave you with something to ponder.

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